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  • Cumberbatch RULES! My attraction to him is all about his intensity in his roles whether dramatic or humorous and I super duper loved him in Sherlock and the new Star Trek movie! I also loved him in TinkerTailor Solider Spy with a few of my other movie loves!

    I tend to have loves based on different things, some are just hot like fire mixed with sexy usually purely visual , some are super duper talented, some bring something different yet memorable to every role and some have the inexplicable it factor which just draws you in. Cumberbatch has 3 of the four. He isn't No# 1 but I love to watch him act and I like what I've seen of his off screen presence.

    ETA
    Originally posted by isadora View Post
    Ryan O'Neal is a fascinating person who was once a great screen presence who also happens to be a total fucking monster in real life. And I enjoyed all those movies, too!
    Isadora's quote is why celebs being so accessible can be to their determent! The media reports everything they find out if they don't the interwebs does. Some times I would rather not know how much of a douche bag you are in real life so I can just enjoy your work. Ryan has the benefit of years of love for his work before I knew he was an asshole! When you watch actors as a kid or young adult that love is hard to fade!
    Last edited by chandy824; 07-30-2013, 08:03 AM.

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    • Word!I hate having to disentangle my love for Mel Gibson's early movies from the knowledge of his real life behaviour. I do find it harder for some than others though (Ryan O'Neal movies I can enjoy without worrying about it for some reason!).

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      • I hate that Alec Baldwin is such a horrible human being because he's so damn funny to watch on TV.

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        • em!!!

          Come and tell us what/how/if things are going poorly for The Mortal Instruments!

          I want all the gory-ness.

          WHAT IS THE SCUTTLEBUTT.

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          • I will be going on Monday and can let you know if Em doesn't. My fourteen year old SON is a huge fan of the series. I refuse to tell him it used to be HP incest fic. I just refuse. He just started to enjoy reading, and I don't care what it is. As long as he reads.

            Obvs, I will just be able to tell you about the movie, not any industry insider information.
            Last edited by jennchum; 08-23-2013, 07:23 PM.

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            • Obvs, I will just be able to tell you about the movie, not any industry insider information.
              Well, that's something. I don't know that anyone else here is going, and I'm curious. I've only seen one reaction on my twitter TL by someone who was formerly enthused about it . . . but the best they could say afterwards was that it was mediocre.

              Rotten Tomatoes is giving it a 13%.

              http://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/the_...ative_fantasy/

              The Mortal Instruments: City of Bones
              13%

              When gauging the potential audience for The Mortal Instruments: City of Bones, a classic Hollywood tagline comes to mind: "You read the book. Now see the movie!" In this case, critics say only those familiar with the source novel will be able make much of an emotional investment in this overstuffed, overlong mashup of familiar fantasy elements. Lily Collins stars as a New York City teenager who discovers that she's from a long line of half-human, half-angel demon-killers; soon, she's on a mission to rescue her mother and stop a powerful object from falling into the wrong hands. The pundits say The Mortal Instruments: City of Bones may appeal to its target audience, but everyone else is likely to find it derivative, confusing, and short on excitement.
              Maybe this is why Cassie and co. were appealing to tumblr folks on feminist grounds to go see it? Perhaps CC saw a rough cut and knew it was going to be a stinker.

              I honestly thought it would do better box office. It was EVERYWHERE promotion-wise.

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              • I thought it would do worse.

                1. I can't believe there are 24 million books sold in this series. Snick is the only person I know who has read it.
                2. It has ZERO groundswell.
                3. It has low crossover appeal (your movie adaptation is not a runaway hit until my mom friends read the book) it depends entirely on teens who have read it. And it also depends on them loving the source material. I never see/hear anything about this series on any social media platform. Ever. So the demographic is very narrow.
                3. No one cares about the cast. I haven't seen a peep about any of them on social media, either.
                Itís just really honestly so tiring and emotionally draining to have to get upset over reality constantly.

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                • It has low crossover appeal (your movie adaptation is not a runaway hit until my mom friends read the book)
                  My mother and my SIL and most of my mother's friends have read it! My mother even owns the box set as well as a set of paperbacks. And yes, that's sad -- but as book premises go, they are totally up her alley.

                  I never see/hear anything about this series on any social media platform.
                  I actually saw quite a bit of twittering about it . . . but that's probably because I follow a whole bunch of YA authors and editors and agents, who all have a vested interest in seeing YA movie adaptations do well. So that made me think *everyone* was talking about it more widely, when really . . . not so much, I guess.

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                  • I read it, but I don't remember a single thing about it. Not even one detail. My sister, however, LOVED THEM. She pushed me to read them, because OMG! Best books ever! They definitely were not.

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                    • My older daughter buys random YA books to read at work and then hands them down to me, so I had read the first one months ago. I wasn't impressed so my interest in the rest of the series had fizzled out even before I knew any of the back story.

                      I might possibly go see the movie on discount night if I have nothing better to do. And there is nothing on tv. And someone else offers to pay.

                      Jennchum: all I remember is the nerdy best friend gets turned into a rodent and stolen by vampires.. Seriously, that's it.
                      Last edited by gloopdygleep; 08-23-2013, 08:49 PM.

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                      • I don't know anyone who has read it or ever talks about it!

                        I read a few snippets and found it waaaay overwritten but I know almost nothing about it.
                        Itís just really honestly so tiring and emotionally draining to have to get upset over reality constantly.

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                        • Joss Whedon weighs in: http://insidemovies.ew.com/2013/08/2...back-twilight/

                          According to him all these movies, Twilight, Mortal Instruments, etc., are getting it all wrong as far as female driven narratives go.

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                          • I love Buffy but I'm tired of Joss being a feminist know-it-all.
                            Itís just really honestly so tiring and emotionally draining to have to get upset over reality constantly.

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                            • The AV Club reviewer apparently went to see it:

                              Carrie Raisler ‏@TVandDinners 10h
                              "This book that totally bored me will be a completely acceptable and non-boring movie!" - Me, in a more innocent time 15 minutes ago
                              Ha!

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                              • I agree with Joss that movies should be complete movies, not bridges to the next movie. That said, Empire Strikes Back RULEZ.

                                “Empire committed the cardinal sin of not actually ending,” Whedon noted during his 10-page deep-dive interview with Entertainment Weekly in this week’s issue. “Which at the time I was appalled by and I still think it was a terrible idea.”

                                To which your EW interviewer blurted: “You think Empire had a bad ending?”

                                “Well, it’s not an ending,” Whedon explained about the 1980 film, which had a cliffhanger leading into the next entry of the series, Return of the Jedi. “It’s a Come Back Next Week, or in three years. And that upsets me. I go to movies expecting to have a whole experience. If I want a movie that doesn’t end I’ll go to a French movie. That’s a betrayal of trust to me. A movie has to be complete within itself, it can’t just build off the first one or play variations.”
                                As for what he says about the current crop of YA adaptations:
                                We also prodded Whedon, who pioneered the modern teenage vampire saga with The WB’s Buffy the Vampire Slayer, for how he felt about the Twilight films and The CW’s The Vampire Diaries.

                                “A small part of you is like: ‘Well, you know, I did that first. I liked that band before they were popular,’” he says. “The thing about Buffy for me is–on a show-by-show basis–are there female characters who are being empowered, who are driving the narrative? The Twilight thing and a lot of these franchise attempts coming out, everything rests on what this girl will do, but she’s completely passive, or not really knowing what the hell is going on. And that’s incredibly frustrating to me because a lot of what’s taking on the oeuvre of Buffy, is actually a reaction against it. Everything is there — except for the Buffy. A lot of things aimed at the younger kids is just Choosing Boyfriends: The Movie.”
                                Okay, he's not wrong that in cases where it feels like the female pivot point of the show is passive and lacks agency (like most of TVD S4, let's be honest) there's no true empowerment going on. Same for Joey Potter.

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