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  • dada_teacher
    replied
    Maze Runner: The Death Cure



    I think they have left in the trailer the scene where Dylan O' Brien had his accident!

    Leave a comment:


  • LaaLaa
    replied
    Srslyyyyyy. Just bought tickets for Thursday night! brb gonna watch the trailer three more times before bed.

    Leave a comment:


  • roly
    replied
    Oh my god, ditto about the FEELS! I started to tear up! Han and Leia, Han and Leia!

    Link to the trailer for anyone who hasn't seen it. The music! I am going to be a blubbering mess in the theater before the credits even start.

    Leave a comment:


  • vanessa
    replied
    The new Star Wars trailer gives me all the feelings. So much so that I bought myself a ticket for the all 6 movies marathon, which might be clinically insane of me.

    Leave a comment:


  • ophy
    replied
    Really had fun with this book, and it's hard to not root for Mae and Lauren, so I think this could be great:

    http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/new...ham-mae-832286


    Lauren Graham, Mae Whitman Teaming Up to Adapt 'The Royal We' (Exclusive)

    Lauren Graham and Mae Whitman, who worked together on TV’s long-running drama Parenthood, are teaming up to adapt the The Royal We, the book by Jessica Morgan and Heather Cocks, for CBS Films.

    Graham will write the script for the project, which is being eyed as an acting vehicle for Whitman. The duo will also produce.

    Published earlier this year by Grand Central Publishing, We takes its cues from the real-life courtship of Kate Middleton and Prince William. The story is of an American girl-next-door who moves to England to study at Oxford and falls in love with a fellow student, who happens to be the future King of England. There’s even a red-headed troublemaking brother on one side and a sister on the other. And there's his need for secrecy, her sudden tabloid fame and the royal family’s many requirements.
    I wasn't picturing Mae Whitman as the Kate Middleton character, but I can see where that might really work.

    Leave a comment:


  • ophy
    replied
    Twice the Tom Hardy, you guys!


    Legends: https://www.yahoo.com/movies/watch-a...426727177.html


    Love the idea of Hardy going all Maslany on us with this twin role. And I'm a bit of a sucker for British gangster movies anyway, don't know why.

    Leave a comment:


  • ophy
    replied
    I'm cautiously excited about the new Pixar movie Inside Out. It sounds like the most perfectest thing ever for the ophygirl, who has been replaying the trailer non-stop for days. But on the other hand, when she gets disappointed in something she's built up in her head, the fallout can be brutal.

    This interview with Mindy Kaling and Amy Poehler is very encouraging, though:

    http://www.vulture.com/2015/06/amy-p...nside-out.html

    It also features two of Hollywood's funniest women, Amy Poehler and Mindy Kaling. In the animated film, they voice some of the emotions who live in the mind of young Riley, an 11-year-old girl feeling adrift and depressed after her family's cross-country move: While Joy (played by Poehler) clashes with Sadness (Phyllis Smith from The Office) over how Riley should react to her new situation, Disgust (Kaling), Fear (Bill Hader), and Anger (Lewis Black) are left to steer the girl into tricky emotional territory. It's heady stuff (literally!), and in large part thanks to Poehler and Kaling, Pixar pulls it off.
    Q:The macro story here, beyond what's going on in Riley's mind, is about a girl who's bummed and doesn't know how to talk to her parents about it. The fact that a $200 million movie would be made about something that simple but relatable is so refreshing to me.

    Mindy Kaling: I love that. She doesn't have to find an amulet, she doesn't have to reverse a spell to save her father, all she has to do is learn how to be happy. Just the fact that Pixar would put the importance of mental health on a pedestal and say, "If you're uncomfortable about something, it's worth talking about and it's a journey worth seeing," is fantastic. The fact that Pete [Docter], the director, is writing this about young women makes you want to give him a big smooch. He's really a good guy.

    Q:One of the things I found most unique about this movie — and it's already pretty unique in most ways — is that in the end credits, there's actually an "additional jokes by" credit that's given to many of the actors. You don't often see something so generous in Hollywood.

    Poehler: It's yet another example of why Pixar succeeds: They're generous in how they collaborate, and they're not stingy. It's a very democratic group-mind over there, and it's just a confirmation of my theory that talented people are usually good collaborators because they're not coming from a fear-based place of only having one good idea.

    Q:What did they think of it? The film is so smart that I've seen people wondering whether it will play well to young children.

    Poehler: My boy is 6, so he's in the Anger demo right now. [Laughs.] He thinks it's really funny when the fire comes out of Anger's head, and he loves when Disgust gets Anger mad. That, by far, is my kids' favorite comedic setpiece. Am I sure that they got the idea that no feeling is final and change is the only thing you can depend on? I'm not sure, but they feel this thing there. And, you know, too many films are too ahead of children when it comes to violence, and there's never any question of, "Is this gun-shooting too sophisticated for them?" Too many films decide, "Your child is almost ready to handle this violence." It's so cool, then, that Pixar says, "Or your child is almost ready to handle these conversations about his emotions."

    But the best part of the interview is this riff about The Daily Show:

    Amy, last question: I can't imagine you had the time in your schedule for it, but did Comedy Central approach you to host The Daily Show, as rumored?

    Poehler: Well ...

    Kaling: I'll answer it.

    Poehler: Yeah, Mindy, answer it for me. Mindy's my manager. A lot of people don't know this.

    Kaling: I have a little management company.

    Poehler: Tiny.

    Kaling: I rep just a handful of really elite female talents.

    Poehler: It's Danica Patrick …

    Kaling: Danica Patrick, you, Ruth Bader Ginsburg for personal appearances …

    Poehler: … and the bee girl from the Blind Melon video. Who's an amazing poet.

    Kaling: And Mulan. So I rep those people, and they came to me and said, "Does Amy want to do The Daily Show?" And I said, "I've never heard of it."

    Poehler: And she called me and told me that and I said, "That's troubling. As a manager, you should know this."

    Kaling: And then we had an acrimonious falling-out and she fired me.

    Poehler: If there was an offer, it fell apart because Mindy blew it.

    Kaling: That's why I'm just gonna stick to writing and acting. [Whispering to Poehler] I feel bad! Do you want to answer that question for real?

    Poehler: [Shakes head vigorously.]
    Some kind of dramz there, I guess!


    But yeah, I have high hopes that Inside Out will help the ogirl talk about her FEELINGS which is a tricky thing for her.


    Leave a comment:


  • ophy
    replied
    To be fair, he actually is a screenwriter for tv. So it's not as cray as I thought it was when it sounded like she dragged her rando slob off the couch and said, "Honey? Have you ever wanted to be responsible for a billion dollar movie franchise? HERE'S YOUR CHANCE."

    Doesn't look like he's ever written an actual movie before, but he has written several Wild At Hearts and Monarch of The Glens.

    He also blogs on what it means to be Mr.Fifty, so there is that as well.

    http://blog.niallleonard.com/?p=168
    http://blog.niallleonard.com/?p=174

    Leave a comment:


  • isadora
    replied
    She's a genius, maybe? In terms of contract negotiations, she's the Anti-L.J. Smith!

    I say if she's got this leverage? Make ALL the money, girl!

    Leave a comment:


  • ophy
    replied
    I don't think the journey of making these movies could get any weirder/crazier/awkward-er/more LOLtastic . . .

    http://variety.com/2015/film/news/fi...nd-1201477673/

    ‘Fifty Shades’ Sequel to Be Written by E.L. James’ Husband

    Niall Leonard, E.L. James husband, has been tapped to pen “Fifty Shades Darker,” the sequel to Universal’s “Fifty Shades of Grey;”

    Leave a comment:


  • roly
    replied
    Um, I would make out with 90-year old Harrison Ford if I had the chance. He's HAN FUCKING SOLO.

    Ahem. I also saw that trailer before a few movies this fall/winter and laughed my ass off every time. I mean, I hate her and her GOOP-y ambitions as it is but seriously, that movie is going to be so fucking terrible. Back to writing about BBQ's in old timey English for you, Boobs Leggsley!

    Leave a comment:


  • IssieCol
    replied
    Is she gonna make out with 70 year old Harrison Ford in this? Because that's what the trailer is telling me and NOPE. Not tryna see that.

    Leave a comment:


  • isadora
    replied
    OMG, I saw a trailer for this a couple of weeks ago and I meant to post about it! This movie looks amazing/terrible? I'm almost considered taking myself out to the movies to enjoy it on the big screen.

    Leave a comment:


  • LaaLaa
    replied
    The commercials for The Age of Adaline are making me cry-laugh. I already didn't take Blake Lively as an actual actress that seriously, but then a movie (that takes itself soooo seriously) in which she looks like Blake Lively in every decade, hugs her older-than-her daughter, and finally allows herself to love a mortal...

    Leave a comment:


  • ophy
    replied
    Okay, nevermind. Maybe the sequels won't even happen now that James is holding everything up.

    http://variety.com/2015/film/news/fi...er-1201436512/


    According to insiders, the delay in the production of “Fifty Shades Darker” is related to the fact that Universal execs and James are still arguing over details. Unlike most successful franchises, which aim to retain the team behind the first film, it appears that “Fifty Shades” will undergo a dramatic creative reshuffling in the weeks to come. Sources close to the project don’t expect director Sam Taylor-Johnson or screenwriter Kelly Marcel to be back for the second installment, though reps for the studio say no official decisions have been made.
    If James does write the screenplay for “Fifty Shades Darker,” it could mean a later release date for the sequel. James has never written a film before, and the studio may need to factor in extra time for revisions. But as in the case of Gillian Flynn, who wrote both the book and screenplay for “Gone Girl,” the project could potentially benefit from an author adapting her own characters.
    Ha.

    It’s rare in showbiz for an author to exercise the kind of oversight that James has had over the bigscreen journey of “Fifty Shades.” James didn’t peddle the movie rights until her books were already a worldwide phenomenon, and every studio in town wanted to adapt the trilogy, which gave her considerable bargaining power. As a result, she was able to negotiate a deal with Universal and Focus Features that gave her control over how Christian and Anastasia would appear in the film. Not only does she exercise casting approval — she first met Jamie Dornan, who plays Christian, at his audition in Los Angeles (and was a fan of his work on the BBC TV series “The Fall”) — she’s also credited as a producer on the first movie.When J.K. Rowling sold her “Harry Potter” books to Warner Bros., she weighed in on a few creative decisions — asking that the cast be made up of British actors, for example. But then she allowed the filmmakers to take liberties with her stories. The films’ screenwriter, Steve Kloves, has said Rowling was hands-off. The same went for Stephenie Meyer, author of the “Twilight” franchise, which inspired “50 Shades.”

    On the other hand, James was very involved in all aspects of the “Fifty Shades” film, as she attended creative meetings to make sure that the film didn’t veer too far from her book. According to sources, James, who has no prior film experience, would at times hold up the creative process by offering input that wasn’t in line with the filmmakers’ vision. But given James’ contract with Universal, the director and other producers on the film couldn’t go around her.

    James and director Taylor-Johnson constantly fought on set and in the editing room on details surrounding the movie. “We disagreed a lot,” Taylor-Johnson told Variety in January. “She created these characters and the story. I was trying to create a film experience that would honor the book but at the same time give us a fresh perspective. That was difficult for her. We’d battle things out. I think you could say we crossed every scenario through our battles.”

    While it’s not clear why Taylor-Johnson wouldn’t be back for the sequel, it’s likely both sides aren’t eager to rehash similar arguments. James and Marcel worked on the first draft of “Fifty Shades of Grey” at the author’s London home. But once the studio asked for revisions to tone down the sexual content, Marcel and James had a falling out, according to sources. Patrick Marber was brought in for the rewrites. (Marcel, who declined to be interviewed, hasn’t been part of the “Fifty Shades” press tour.)

    In the meantime, production uncertainty has also made scheduling difficult for stars Jamie Dornan and Dakota Johnson. The two actors are now hot casting commodities. But since they don’t know when they’ll need to disrobe for the next “Fifty Shades,” they haven’t been able to commit to other roles in the near future.
    #trainwreck

    Leave a comment:

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