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  • isadora
    replied
    Oh, GIRL, the sexism in health care if horrific across the board. Women's bodies are treated as being male but with "girl stuff" that throws everybody's calculations off! Like how allllllll medicines are tested ONLY on men unless the medicine is specifically for lady parts! It's insane.

    I don't even know if I get a pelvic exam? I know I get a pap smear every year. What's the diff? I don't mind it. I have the kind of HPV that has only one symptom: It puts me at a high risk for cancer. So I get one every 12-18 months.

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  • ophy
    replied
    Do gynecologists there do them regularly? They don't here.
    Yes! Apparently, most women in the US get a pelvic exam every time they go to the gynecologist -- and currently it's recommended to do it yearly. In the article, the docs says women expect it, even if they don't need it.

    If y'all aren't doing it as often, then you are already more in line with this new turn in medical thinking about it.



    So . . . this kind of casual systemic sexism in the ER is TERRIFYING to me.

    http://www.theatlantic.com/health/ar...sexism/410515/


    Emergency-room patients are supposed to be immediately assessed and treated according to the urgency of their condition. Most hospitals use the Emergency Severity Index, a five-level system that categorizes patients on a scale from “resuscitate” (treat immediately) to “non-urgent” (treat within two to 24 hours).I knew which end of the spectrum we were on. Rachel was nearly crucified with pain, her arms gripping the metal rails blanched-knuckle tight. I flagged down the first nurse I could.

    “My wife,” I said. “I’ve never seen her like this. Something’s wrong, you have to see her.”

    “She’ll have to wait her turn,” she said. Other nurses’ reactions ranged from dismissive to condescending. “You’re just feeling a little pain, honey,” one of them told Rachel, all but patting her head.
    “Female pain might be perceived as constructed or exaggerated”: We saw this from the moment we entered the hospital, as the staff downplayed Rachel’s pain, even plain ignored it. In her essay, Jamison refers back to “The Girl Who Cried Pain,” a study identifying ways gender bias tends to play out in clinical pain management. Women are “more likely to be treated less aggressively in their initial encounters with the health-care system until they ‘prove that they are as sick as male patients,’” the study concludes—a phenomenon referred to in the medical community as “Yentl Syndrome.”
    I felt certain of this: The diagnosis of kidney stones—repeated by the nurses and confirmed by the attending physician’s prescribed course of treatment—was a denial of the specifically female nature of Rachel’s pain. A more careful examiner would have seen the need for gynecological evaluation; later, doctors told us that Rachel’s swollen ovary was likely palpable through the surface of her skin. But this particular ER, like many in the United States, had no attending OB-GYN. And every nurse’s shrug seemed to say, “Women cry—what can you do?”

    Nationwide, men wait an average of 49 minutes before receiving an analgesic for acute abdominal pain. Women wait an average of 65 minutes for the same thing. Rachel waited somewhere between 90 minutes and two hours.


    This woman almost died, because her pain was dismissed over and over again and she was ignored for many hours. This drives me nuts.

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  • dada_teacher
    replied
    Ok. There was an issue of lost in translation here. I was talking about pap test and ultrasound and I do those annually and actually feel better/safer when I do them. I just googled pelvic exam and I only had two of those, one in every pregnancy. Do gynecologists there do them regularly? They don't here.

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  • ophy
    replied
    I think the more preemptive exams you do, the better.
    That's exactly the POV some folks are combating, because they are arguing that it's NOT actually better.

    Citing 60 years of research, the ACP found no evidence that the screening, performed about 63 million times annually at a cost of approximately $2.6 billion, detects cancer or other serious conditions. The exam, researchers reported, did cause harm: One-third of women reported discomfort, pain, embarrassment or anxiety—leading some to avoid care altogether. For roughly 1 percent of women, a suspicious finding triggered a cascade of anxiety-provoking interventions—including tests and surgery, which carry a risk of complications for conditions that nearly always turned out to be benign.
    One of the first studies to suggest that routine pelvic exams were unnecessary, even potentially harmful, was published in 2011 by Carolyn Westhoff, a professor of obstetrics and gynecology who directs the division of family planning and preventive services at the Columbia University School of Medicine.Westhoff’s team compared outcomes research in the United States and in parts of Western Europe, including the United Kingdom, where the exam is performed only on women who have symptoms, and found a huge disparity in hysterectomies, which they linked in part to the use of routine pelvic exams. (The U.S. rate is more than double that of Western European countries, including the United Kingdom.) Pelvic exams, they concluded, are not recommended to screen for ovarian cancer, are not used to detect sexually transmitted infections, are not a prerequisite for many forms of contraception including birth-control pills, are “uncomfortable, disliked by many women,” “use scarce time during a well-woman visit,” and contribute to high health costs without a corresponding benefit.

    In an interview, Westhoff said that doctors routinely find a lot of unimportant conditions and then “start ordering tests or more frequent exams” or surgery, which carries a risk of complications for things that don’t need treatment. “If a woman is asymptomatic, we should leave well enough alone.”


    Personally, my uterus is upside down, so exams are insanely painful and difficult. Plus, my insurance doesn't cover them, so I have to pay out of pocket. It's not something I am going to do yearly (or at all) unless I have a really good reason to.
    Last edited by ophy; 10-15-2015, 12:24 PM.

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  • dada_teacher
    replied
    I don't know, you guys. Maybe they are not necessary, but why not doing them every year? I think the more preemptive exams you do, the better.

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  • ophy
    replied
    Yet another article saying that we don't actually need yearly pelvic exams:


    http://www.theatlantic.com/health/ar...urce=SFTwitter


    Ya gotta love that the main reason why gynecologists want to keep the 'every year' mandate is because they are literally worried about their own jobs/what is expected of them/getting paid by insurance and that's what underlies their objections to new guidelines. According to this article, anyway. This goes farther than other articles I've seen, though . . . they actually state that you might not need an exam unless/until you are symptomatic. That's very reassuring to me, who hasn't had an exam in nearly ten years.

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  • zeitghost
    replied
    Anyone seen the looncup http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencete...n-s-cycle.html - accordingly it sends the info on your flow etc to your phone app. Sounds as creepy as hell.

    Leave a comment:


  • Res
    replied
    I was at a doctor appointment yesterday and right in the middle of a sentence she pulls off her lab coat and says, "Hot flash!"
    So far peri-meno hasn't been too bad for me - - after a 6 month "Ha! Fooled you" break with the monthlies I am free from that hassle.

    Leave a comment:


  • ophy
    replied
    I did see that! I am seriously considering them, although I'm not crazy about the 'rinsing them in the sink' aspect.


    My periods have been all over the place lately. We've gone on three family vacas this year so far, and I've been on my period for every single one of them (and all of them involved swimming pools so *sigh*). Trying a new tracking app (called Clue) to see if that helps me prepare better -- but honestly, I'm just kinda hanging on 'til menopause. Having your period in your 40s when you have zero desire to get preggers at all seems so pointless and dumb. Having periods for 30 years straight seems so pointless and dumb.


    You shouldn't start having periods until you are 25. And then menopause should happen the day after your 40th birthday and be all over with in 12 hours.


    Leave a comment:


  • LaaLaa
    replied
    ophy! Did you see the Buzzfeed post about Thinx?! A review from a tampon chick and she felt no yuckiness! I'm trying them.

    Because today, for the first time ever, my tamp slipped out while I was peeing. I had JUST put it in an hour before. I had to awkwardly haul ass to my desk to grab an emergency pad and speedwalk past the all-glass conference room where my entire office was eating lunch and had just seen me come from the bathroom a minute before. Ladytime is so many circles of hell.
    Last edited by LaaLaa; 09-30-2015, 11:23 PM.

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  • ophy
    replied
    For those of y'all who use birth control but would like to get off the pill, there is a spiffy new diaphragm on the market:

    http://www.caya.us.com/












    I don't know why, but making it purple makes it seem like fun.

    Leave a comment:


  • ophy
    replied
    Ophy have you ever looked into surgical options to permanently correct your retroverted uterus?

    I did a few years ago, but the surgery wasn't covered by my insurance at all. That might be different now, I'll have to check.

    I don't care how 'minimally' invasive something is, the whole idea freaks me out. Other than my eyes (which sort of doesn't count?), I haven't any kind of surgery at all since I had my tonsils out twenty years ago. And this! Would be someone moving stuff around *inside* my abdomen! C'mon, that's freaky.


    My period started late Friday night, which means I *might* get to go in the water by this upcoming Friday. If I'm super lucky, maybe Thursday evening as well. Whoo hoo.

    I tried to wade in up to my knees today, but a wave came in almost immediately and rendered my pad useless. I had to waddle back to the condo tout suite.

    And so I wait alone.



    Leave a comment:


  • gloopdygleep
    replied
    Ophy have you ever looked into surgical options to permanently correct your retroverted uterus? I know there are laparoscopic minimally invasive surgeries out there that can correct the position of the uterus and help minimize or eliminate all the problems that are associated with this condition (painful intercourse, painful periods, urinary frequency, abdominal protrusions...).

    Sorry if I'm overstepping and I'm sure you've looked into these options, but since I work in this field and see these types of things on a daily basis I can't help but ask.

    Leave a comment:


  • ophy
    replied
    Nah, the mooncup UK would be too long for me. If I actually had time, I'd consider trying out a MeLuna shorty from Germany. It's one of the few really short ones on the market.

    Not that it matters, we leave tomorrow. The only cup I can actually buy today at a local retail store is a honking big Diva Cup, and no way in hell could I use one of those.

    Odds are high that none of them would work for me anyway, so oh well. I'm going to use this loss of a real vacation to angle for another beach trip at the end of the summer for just me and mr.o. It's our ten year wedding anniversary, so I already have an excuse to plan one 'as a surprise'.

    Leave a comment:


  • zeitghost
    replied
    Would a mooncup work for you? I think they are in the U.S. As MCUK but their site says they can be used but not by all people. Here's some info
    http://www.mooncup.co.uk/advice-centre/faqs.html

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